when will stendra be available healthcare
unanimously seasons viagra online buy viagra online dresses ThinkGenealogy | genealogy, software, ideas, and innovation
friend

Family History in the Year 2364

Tuesday, 5 Apr 2011 | by Mark Tucker

Or should I say, “Stardate 41986.0”?

I am not a huge Star Trek fan (no clothing, action figures, of collection of DVDs), but I do enjoy the show.  This year I introduced the TV series to my sons and it is a great father-sons moment that we share as we watch episodes of TNG together via Tivo.

A few weeks ago, we watched episode 26 from the first season. It was based in the 24th century when officers from the Enterprise come across on old earth satellite that turns out to be a cryonics capsule housing some frozen earth inhabitants from approximately 300 years in the past.

I don’t want to focus on the whole cryonic piece but it does setup the scene for some 24th century family history.  It is also interesting that the woman in the episode gets a chance to meet her 5th great grandson when she returns to earth.

 

Here are some clips from the episode:

 

24th Century Genealogy Research

 

Think back to 1988 in the world of genealogy. There was no internet as we know it today. No Ancestry.com or FamilySearch or the multitude of genealogy sites and blogs. The cutting edge genealogy software was PAF 2.1 for DOS, Apple PRO-DOS, and Macintosh.

What else was happening in the sphere of family history in 1988?

How close do you think we are to what was presented in the episode?

What is your vision of family history research in the year 2364?

Would you like to visit your 5th great grandchild? What would you say?

How would you like a visit from a past ancestor? Who would you want it to be? Who would you not want to visit you?

 

Now go and research an ancestor that no one has researched before.

Google Doodle for Ancestry

Sunday, 3 Apr 2011 | by Mark Tucker

 

image

Google Doodle

When searching Google, it is fun to be greeted by a redesign of the Google logo to celebrate an important individual or event. These are called doodles:

Doodles are known as the decorative changes that are made to the Google logo to celebrate holidays, anniversaries, and the lives of famous artists and scientists. Whether it is the beginning of Spring, Albert Einstein’s birthday, or the 50th anniversary of understanding DNA, the doodle team never fails to find artistic ways to celebrate these unique events.

Having a little bit of fun with the corporate logo by redesigning it from time to time is unheard of at many companies but at Google, it is a part of the brand. While the doodle is primarily a fun way for the company to recognize events and notable people, it also illustrates the creative and innovative personality of the company itself.

You can learn more about Google Doodle history and see past logos at this link.

I don’t have any samples of Google Doodles in this post due to the following request by Google:

Although we’d like to accommodate all the requests we receive from users who want to add a touch of Google to their sites, we are passionate about protecting the reputation of our brand as an objective and fair provider of search results. We allow use of the Google logo by express permission only.

 

Ancestry Doodle

I know that Ancestry.com takes their branding very seriously and might not appreciate me messing with their logo.  What I want to accomplish is to show how an Ancestry Doodle might look and how it could be used to promote not only the Ancestry brand but also special occasions or promotions of the company.

Yesterday I received an e-mail from Ancestry about free access to Civil War records:

image

What if (in addition to the e-mail) Ancestry were to change it’s logo from April 7-14th as a way to promote the free access to records?  The logo might look like the one shown at the top of this post.

What do you think? Do you think Ancestry will do it? What events do you suggest should be represented? Any graphic-talented people willing to create some sample Ancestry Doodles in the same fashion as Google Doodles? Why leave all the fun to Ancestry, what other family history company logos deserve a doodle?

 

The Making of the Ancestry Doodle

I must confess that my graphics talent is somewhat limited, so to make the Ancestry Doodle, I used tracing paper. Here are links to where I got the original images that I traced.

(more…)

P-51D Aircraft Tells a Story

Saturday, 26 Mar 2011 | by Mark Tucker

Today, I attended the Pima Air & Space Museum with a Boy Scout troop. It was amazing to see just how many planes they had. If each aircraft could speak, it could tell its own story of the places it flew, the battles it fought, the people that piloted (or navigated, gunned, maintained, etc.).

There was a P-51D that was particularly interesting. On its side was recorded the planes that it had downed:

image

 

Besides the 7 German & 1 Japanese aircraft there was a symbol that I didn’t recognize (#6) and a U.S. flag:

(more…)

Talking Family History Photos

Monday, 21 Mar 2011 | by Mark Tucker

What if you could talk to your deceased ancestors?

What would you like them to tell you?

Now there is a fun way to bring your ancestor photos to life and let them tell their own stories in their “own” voices. Crazy Talk Animator lets you add realistic animations to your photographs and record your own dialog. The software takes care of moving the mouth on the photo and synching it with what you said.

Here is a short video sample that I created with the 15-day trial version of the software. I hope the watermarks don’t distract too much from the effect. I did this after playing with the software for about 2 hours.

I showed this to my boys ages 9-13 and they thought it was cool. Saying that something dealing with family history is cool doesn’t happen every day.

Priceless.

Which ancestor’s photo would you like to bring to life?  What would you have them say? Do you think that talking family history photos could be of any value in sharing your family history?

GenPerfect 3

Sunday, 20 Mar 2011 | by Mark Tucker

GenPerfect is connected and social.

 

Facebook

In my first GenPerfect post I mentioned that you could add living members to your database via Facebook. Lately my third cousin has added me to two closed Facebook groups for common ancestors: Thomas Tucker Family & William Henry Dollar Family

Members of these groups include living descendants of a common ancestor. Messages include the lineage of members back to the common ancestor as well as photos and digitized documents. What if GenPerfect could be pointed to these groups? You could see the list of your messages inside your genealogy software on the dashboard. The messages could be parsed and the mini-lineage added to your database citing Facebook as the source. Any photos added to the group would be imported as part of your media collection. GenPerfect would even allow you to update your Facebook status without leaving the application. You could configure the software to automatically prompt you for a Facebook status update at key moment such as when you add a photo or document or when you enter a conclusion and close out a research project. You could choose to post these to a group or your wall.

 

Twitter

Similar to updating your Facebook status, you could also choose to tweet from inside GenPerfect. When prompted to update your status, you could choose to also post to Twitter.

 

Blogs

By selecting a photo, some information in a database, or a research project and clicking a “Quick Post” link, a blog post would be assembled ready for you to edit and post to your blog. All without leaving GenPerfect.

(more…)

Two Family History Infographics

Sunday, 20 Mar 2011 | by Mark Tucker

Where Family History meets Design

 

Online Family History Trends

This infographic provided by Archives.com shows trends and growth in the family history industry. The full report and infographic can be viewed on the Archives.com blog.

Online Family History Trends

(more…)

« Previous Page | Next Page »

Powered by WordPress | Theme by Roy Tanck

Copyright 2010 Mark Tucker. All rights reserved.