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Video: Family ChArtist Overview

Monday, 22 Feb 2010 | by Mark Tucker

 

 

Last month at the Arizona Family History Expo, I was surprised by what I saw at the Generation Maps booth.  For 15 minutes, Janet Hovorka showed me around Family ChArtist and it just made sense – empower family historians to create beautiful custom charts and streamline the entire process.  On the technology side, the website uses Flash which allows the chart creation application to do things that a standard HTML page cannot.  When she told me that 8.5 x 11 inch charts could be freely printed on my own printer, I couldn’t wait to try it.

The other day I heard the buzz about the Family ChArtist release and couldn’t wait any longer to try it out, so I came up with a plan.  I would ask Janet if there were any videos available for the website and if not I would offer to do one.  Having been in crunch time of application development many times, I figured that there was a good chance that she had not got around to doing any videos yet.  Success!  She fell for it. I got early access to the application, and created a video overview to satisfy my end of the bargain.

OK, the reality wasn’t quite so devious. 

I really enjoyed having a chance to take the application out for a spin and to share how easy it is to create good looking custom family history charts.

I know from talking with Janet that there are many phases of innovation still ahead for Family ChArtist.  I encourage you to give it a try (when it is released on 8 March 2010) and see for yourself what you can achieve.  When you do, post a comment and tell me about your experience.  Also, let me (and Generation Maps) know what else you would like the application to do.

Happy ChArting!

3 Comments »

  1. Hi Mark,
    Thanks for doing this video. I did not get a chance to stop at the Generations Map booth at the Arizona Family History Expo. I am VERY impressed!

    Comment by Michelle Goodrum — 22 Feb 2010 @ 10:14 pm

  2. You are welcome to trick me into something anytime Mark. Thanks.
    Janet

    Comment by Janet Hovorka — 22 Feb 2010 @ 10:20 pm

  3. Mark,
    Great job on the video.

    One question. Can I generate a large chart with ChArtist and take it to a local print store like Kinkos and print it?

    Thanks,
    Rick

    Comment by Rick Koelz — 23 Feb 2010 @ 10:46 am

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