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unanimously seasons viagra online buy viagra online dresses Comments on: What if Genealogy had a TED Conference? http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/ genealogy, software, ideas, and innovation Sat, 21 Jul 2012 21:16:56 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.2 By: Denise Levenick http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/comment-page-1/#comment-417 Denise Levenick Mon, 02 Jun 2008 19:08:17 +0000 http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/#comment-417 Thank you, Michael, for the very helpful description of "cluster genealogy." As a writer/researcher, I find the family connections and stories the most interesting part of genealogy and your ideas to track a "historical social community" strike me as a very useful tool. That said, yes, it is quite difficult to construct a set "form" to use as a log for these relationships. What about some tool that also uses a narrative? I have been considering the idea of a family Who's Who, brief prose biographies that would present information in an engaging narrative with sources listed outside the narrative itself. By this I do not mean the prose statement of facts, dates, and places that is generated by genealogy software, but something highly personal and engaging. This would be enhanced by a form that offers the sources and raw data, but the narrative would allow for the human connections to be revealed... A marries B with C as a witness; the narrative could explain that C is the foster child raised by the family of B. I will be checking your website, and enjoy this conversation. Thanks. Thank you, Michael, for the very helpful description of “cluster genealogy.” As a writer/researcher, I find the family connections and stories the most interesting part of genealogy and your ideas to track a “historical social community” strike me as a very useful tool. That said, yes, it is quite difficult to construct a set “form” to use as a log for these relationships.

What about some tool that also uses a narrative? I have been considering the idea of a family Who’s Who, brief prose biographies that would present information in an engaging narrative with sources listed outside the narrative itself. By this I do not mean the prose statement of facts, dates, and places that is generated by genealogy software, but something highly personal and engaging. This would be enhanced by a form that offers the sources and raw data, but the narrative would allow for the human connections to be revealed… A marries B with C as a witness; the narrative could explain that C is the foster child raised by the family of B.

I will be checking your website, and enjoy this conversation. Thanks.

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By: Michael Hait http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/comment-page-1/#comment-410 Michael Hait Fri, 30 May 2008 02:53:22 +0000 http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/#comment-410 I have not quite formalized the system yet, though when I do, I will likely publish the results: on my website, in a magazine/journal, and/or in manuscript form. I am particularly interested in two aspects: the graphical form of note-taking as espoused in Tony Buzan's "Mind Map" concept, and many of the new discoveries/insights of network theory. At this point, my idea of a social web involves a combination of the Pedigree Chart and Family Group Record, similar to an "All-in-One Chart", with additional connections added for non-familial relations. For example, spouses' siblings and siblings' spouses, neighbors, additional parties to deeds, witnesses to baptisms and wills, and others who attended the same church, or shared a similar occupation in the same town, etc. "Cluster genealogy" attempts to reconstruct the social structure surrounding a given individual at a given time and place -- one of the concepts of network theory states that if A knows B, and B knows C, then A is highly likely to at some point know C. In mapping social relationships, one often finds that such social circles indeed exist, with a small group of people often being involved with each other throughout a given period of time in multiple facets. Social circles are best expressed in a very loosely structured format. This makes it quite difficult to create a set "form" (like those in the Toolkit). I have had some success in using the WordArt functions of Microsoft Word, and MS Power Point also works well to a degree. Aside from this project, however, I have indeed been thinking of additional ideas for new forms, and plan to have a few "web-exclusive" forms available on my website soon. Check back often for their availability: http://haitfamilyresearch.com/toolkit.aspx I have not quite formalized the system yet, though when I do, I will likely publish the results: on my website, in a magazine/journal, and/or in manuscript form. I am particularly interested in two aspects: the graphical form of note-taking as espoused in Tony Buzan’s “Mind Map” concept, and many of the new discoveries/insights of network theory.

At this point, my idea of a social web involves a combination of the Pedigree Chart and Family Group Record, similar to an “All-in-One Chart”, with additional connections added for non-familial relations. For example, spouses’ siblings and siblings’ spouses, neighbors, additional parties to deeds, witnesses to baptisms and wills, and others who attended the same church, or shared a similar occupation in the same town, etc. “Cluster genealogy” attempts to reconstruct the social structure surrounding a given individual at a given time and place — one of the concepts of network theory states that if A knows B, and B knows C, then A is highly likely to at some point know C. In mapping social relationships, one often finds that such social circles indeed exist, with a small group of people often being involved with each other throughout a given period of time in multiple facets.

Social circles are best expressed in a very loosely structured format. This makes it quite difficult to create a set “form” (like those in the Toolkit). I have had some success in using the WordArt functions of Microsoft Word, and MS Power Point also works well to a degree.

Aside from this project, however, I have indeed been thinking of additional ideas for new forms, and plan to have a few “web-exclusive” forms available on my website soon. Check back often for their availability: http://haitfamilyresearch.com/toolkit.aspx

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By: Denise Levenick http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/comment-page-1/#comment-406 Denise Levenick Fri, 30 May 2008 00:08:38 +0000 http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/#comment-406 I am glad to see that Michael Hait is still thinking of new research forms -- I use the toolkit to help organize my notes when I have a particular family focus. As I encourage students in my high school classes, I find that the exercise of typing notes or even recopying is a solid learning tool. Michael's ideas of a "social web/map" and "cluster genealogy" are intriguing. Where can I find out more about this? I am glad to see that Michael Hait is still thinking of new research forms — I use the toolkit to help organize my notes when I have a particular family focus. As I encourage students in my high school classes, I find that the exercise of typing notes or even recopying is a solid learning tool. Michael’s ideas of a “social web/map” and “cluster genealogy” are intriguing. Where can I find out more about this?

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By: Michael Hait http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/comment-page-1/#comment-402 Michael Hait Tue, 27 May 2008 19:47:58 +0000 http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/#comment-402 I would like to express support for, and add to, the comment above by Denise - As the author of THE FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH TOOLKIT (Genealogical, 2008), I am obviously very interested in bringing the classic genealogy forms into the 21st century and beyond. While the Toolkit has fillable/savable PDF forms (perfect for sharing information with non-users of genealogy software), I still believe that additional improvements could be made to the forms that are used. Family Group Records and Pedigree Charts have been around forever! One idea that I am toying around with right now is a "social web/social map" idea, taking advantage of the benefits of so-called "cluster genealogy". I am also drawing inspiration from the "genogram" format of graphic representation. I would like to express support for, and add to, the comment above by Denise – As the author of THE FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH TOOLKIT (Genealogical, 2008), I am obviously very interested in bringing the classic genealogy forms into the 21st century and beyond. While the Toolkit has fillable/savable PDF forms (perfect for sharing information with non-users of genealogy software), I still believe that additional improvements could be made to the forms that are used. Family Group Records and Pedigree Charts have been around forever! One idea that I am toying around with right now is a “social web/social map” idea, taking advantage of the benefits of so-called “cluster genealogy”. I am also drawing inspiration from the “genogram” format of graphic representation.

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By: Denise Levenick http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/comment-page-1/#comment-401 Denise Levenick Fri, 23 May 2008 21:08:00 +0000 http://www.thinkgenealogy.com/2008/05/21/what-if-genealogy-had-a-ted-conference/#comment-401 Mark, I would like to see a topic on designing genealogy forms for computer users. As a relative newcomer (10 yrs) to genealogy and fairly tech-savvy it surprises me that more computer-friendly forms are not available for the user. Most books still have printouts to photocopy, but how many people use these. I had to search extensively for .doc forms that I could fill in through MS Word and was very happy to find a set of PDF forms and charts from Michael Hait to use. I would like to use charts and forms that take advantage of color, fonts, styles -- all things that you use admirably in you Geneaology Research Map. I even tried to make a custom research form following the map and using the colors and symbols you set out. . . alas, my charting skills are not up to the task (yet!). Good design does help with good research. Mark, I would like to see a topic on designing genealogy forms for computer users. As a relative newcomer (10 yrs) to genealogy and fairly tech-savvy it surprises me that more computer-friendly forms are not available for the user. Most books still have printouts to photocopy, but how many people use these. I had to search extensively for .doc forms that I could fill in through MS Word and was very happy to find a set of PDF forms and charts from Michael Hait to use.

I would like to use charts and forms that take advantage of color, fonts, styles — all things that you use admirably in you Geneaology Research Map. I even tried to make a custom research form following the map and using the colors and symbols you set out. . . alas, my charting skills are not up to the task (yet!). Good design does help with good research.

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